Parenting and Caregiving Litmus Test: How Am I Doing?

According to The Urban Child Institute, a baby’s brain at birth “already has about all of the neurons it will ever have,” “doubles in size in the first year, and by age three it has reached 80 percent of its adult volume.”  The period from birth to age 3 represents the single most crucial period […]

Conversation with Babies and Toddlers Builds Language as well as Social Thinking

We’ve heard frequently in the child development news and on social media that back-and-forth communication with the zero to three crowd is extremely important for brain development and for school readiness.  We used to think that the number of words we used with babies and toddlers mattered most to their brain and language development, but […]

The World Needs More Observers and Sharers: How Parents and Caregivers Make a Difference in Babies’ and Toddlers’ Lives

Writers and photographers who travel make observations and take what they see to others.  They are “noticers” and “see-ers,” as well as “share-ers,” extraordinaire!  By way of their written or spoken stories or their photos, these amazing observers share their experiences with those who have not had the same experiences or with those who have […]

Basic Tech Rules at Home Make More Time for Verbal Communication with Children

With new data showing that a majority of speech-language pathologists say children’s preoccupation with today’s personal technology is qualitatively different from past generations’ distractions of choice, such as television—with greater potential for harm—speech-language pathologists urge parents to implement some basic tech rules in their households to make time for verbal communication. This advice is especially […]

Sensory Processing In Babies and Toddlers

Sensory processing is a frequently overlooked skill in the under 36 month old set.  Newborns arrive into the world with an already established preference for taking in the environment around them.  They are born with a sensory processing preference either for visual (looking), auditory (listening) or kinesthetic (movement) processing, and this preference will greatly affect […]

Five Numbers to Remember About Early Childhood Development

Five Numbers to Remember About Early Childhood Development The “Five Numbers to Remember” link takes readers to Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child’s website.  The Center’s mission is to leverage the rapidly growing knowledge about the developing brain and human genome, which tells us that early experiences are built into our bodies and that early […]

Trying to Close a Word Gap, Word by Word

Trying to Close a Word Gap, Word by Word The NY Times article, written by Motoko Rich on March 25, 2014, spotlights, once again, the importance of talking to babies and toddlers. By way of the LENA device, a tiny recording device worn by a child that distinguishes between words overheard from TV or other […]